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500 Level Fall 2018

ENGLISH 523:  ADVANCED STUDIES IN BOOK AND DIGITAL CULTURE


ENGL 523.5 Lecture 01: "The Virtual Child"
Instructor:  Derritt Mason
Schedule: Tue/Thu 12:30-1:45

Description:

Now over 30 years old, Jacqueline Rose’s The Case of Peter Pan remains influential for the way it encourages scholars of children’s literature to consider how imagined, figural children profoundly influence the way we, as adults, read, produce, and think about texts for young people. This course will bring Rose into the digital age and ask: who is the virtual child behind the exploding genre of digital texts for children? How is this child constructed through online literature, apps, and interactive forms of storytelling, and what characteristics does this child seem to possess? How might we think through children’s literature, children, and adolescents alongside critical theories of virtuality and new media? How can we theorize a virtual child in relation to the material creative practices of real-life children who participate in online fandom communities like “Let’s Play,” fanfiction.net, and Archive of Our Own? And what does the virtual child tell us about our contemporary fantasies, desires, and anxieties about children, childhood, and pedagogy in an increasingly digital world?


ENGLISH 525: ADVANCED SEMINAR IN A NATIONAL OR TRANSNATIONAL LITERATURE: POST 9/11 LITERATURE


ENGL 525.3 Lecture 01
Instructor: Michael T. Clarke
Schedule: Tue/Thu 12:30-1:45

Description:

This course examines literature concerned with the representation and impact of 9/11. Most of the selected texts will be American, but some will be international. Possible readings include Don DeLillo’s Falling Man, John Updike’s Terrorist, Jonathan Safran Foer’s Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist, Joseph O’Neill’s Netherland, Lynn Sharon Schwartz’s The Writing on the Wall, Amy Waldman’s The Submission, H. M. Naqvi’s Home Boy, selected poetry (Amiri Baraka’s “Somebody Blew Up America,” Robert Pinsky’s “9/11,” Martin Espada’s “Alabanza: In Praise of Local 100,” Robert Creeley’s “Ground Zero,” Suheir Hammad’s, “first writing since,” etc.), and scholarship on 9/11. Questions addressed in this course include the following: What have been the cultural impacts of 9/11? How have writers responded to the event and its aftermath? Are there common characteristics of 9/11 literature? What are the ethical, political, and social issues at stake in representing the event, its actors, its causes, and its effects? Assignments will likely include two essays, a group presentation, and reading responses.