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Submitted by admin on Tue, 10/07/2014 - 2:55pm

Literary Studies in the Department of English, Faculty of Arts

Studying the language in which we live—and its uses, from poetry to politics to the hidden metaphors of everyday life—offers a strong centre from which to explore the world within and beyond the university. Students in this program have opportunities for creativity and intellectual challenge, through broad and intensive reading, through writing, and through discussion with professors and fellow students. This is a program for students who cannot be satisfied by textbook learning: it demands, develops, and rewards intellectual curiosity, articulate speech and writing, and critical thinking. 

News

Named 2017-18 Distinguished Visiting Writer, acclaimed Jamaican novelist will appear at Mac Hall on Feb. 28.

High social media interest reflects excitement for Shraya’s new science fiction literature class.

Course descriptions for Fall 2017 term online now.

English Majors and Minors in third year or above are strongly encouraged to enrol in 500-level courses. Please see course descriptions at https://english.ucalgary.ca/topicscourses.

Department of English publications by Michael T. Clarke, Clem Martini, Suzette Mayr, and more.

UPDATE: Important Information for Prospective English Graduate Students. Full course descriptions now available.

Upcoming Events

Yuval Noah Harari’s Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow

Date & Time:
January 19, 2018 | 9:30 am - 11:30 am

The CIH Working Group on Genomics, Bioinformatics, and the Climate Crisis invites you to join us for this month’s discussion of Yuval Noah Harari’s Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow

Date & Time:
January 26, 2018 - 7:30 pm to January 28, 2018 - 7:30 pm

Shoreditch UK's internationally acclaimed Shakespeare company Malachite Theatre presents Twelfth Night. Directed by Ben Blyth, Ph.D. student.

Date & Time:
January 29, 2018 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

This paper explores the material practices and literary apparatus of seed exchange in eighteenth-century Britain.