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ENGL 201 Course Descriptions (Winter 2017)

ENGLISH 201:  APPROACHES TO LITERATURE


ENGL 201 Lecture : 
Instructor:  
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ENGL 201 Lecture : 
Instructor:  
Schedule: 

Description:


ENGL 201 Lecture : 07: "Living on the Edge: Marginal Visions of Canada and Canadian Identity"
Instructor: Chris Olbey
Schedule: Tue/Thu 8:00-9:15

Description:

Do you look around Canadian society and culture (film, television, magazines, advertising) and feel that the people and the representations of Canadian identity that you see are more or less consistent with how you view your society and yourself? Or, when taking up such a perspective, do you feel that in significant ways the identity of yourself and the communities you identify with are significantly different than these popular cultural constructions of Canadian identity?  Those who answer yes to the first question might locate their own identity as part of mainstream Canadian identity, while those who answer yes to the second might view their own identity as much more marginal to cultural and social constructions of mainstream Canadian identity.

This course will provide instruction in critical reading and writing through the exploration of stories that feature representations of Canada and Canadian identity from the margins and through the lenses of migration, immigration, race and ethnicity, economic class, religion, sexuality and/or other forms of social and cultural marginalization. The narratives studied in this class all focus on challenges to identity faced by characters that inhabit subject positions situated outside traditional and mainstream constructions of Canada and Canadian identity.  What happens when we view fundamental Canadian ideas around rights, freedoms, and opportunities from a position on the margins of Canadian society?  What challenges arise within the process and dynamics of migration and immigration?  How do immigrants negotiate the new cultural location in terms of gender, class, religious and racial differences?  How does the experience of marginalization manifest itself in physical, emotional, and psychological forms?  How are the processes of othering and marginalization worked out in relationship to first nations and indigenous experience and identity? What forms of resistance are developed to resist the dominant processes of othering and marginalization inside Canadian society? Our readings of these narratives will produce an exploration of these and other elements generated out of the experience of migration, immigration, and marginalization.

Course Texts:

Keeper’n Me, All That Matters, Can You Hear the Nightbird Call, What We All Long For 


ENGL 201 Lecture 08: "Poems in Pairs"
Instructor: Maria Zytaruk  
Schedule: Tue/Thu 9:30-10:45 

Description:

This course introduces students to a range of literary styles, techniques, voices, and themes through careful, weekly pairings of poems, old and new. This course will instruct students in detecting the cultural and imaginative cross-currents of these texts and how to talk knowledgeably and write persuasively about literary texts. 


ENGL 201 Lecture 09: "Foregone Conclusions"
Instructor: Morgan Vanek
Schedule: Tue/Thu 11:00-12:15

Description:

Course Texts:

F.X. Toole: Stories From the Corner, Roy MacGregor:The Last Season, Cara Hedley Twenty Miles, The Hunger Games, The Art of Fielding