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500 Level Winter 2018


ENGLISH 517: THEORETICAL AND CULTURAL STUDIES


ENGL 517 Lec 01: "Literary Theory: Advanced"
Instructor: Clara Joseph
Schedule: T R 12:30-1:45

Description:

What is an author? Should literature serve society? What does a text mean? These questions point to fundamental issues -- of authorship, activism, and interpretation.  This course studies primary sources, i.e., original writing by major thinkers such as Foucault, Levinas, Barthes, Freud, Althusser, Said, Hall, Keane, Underwood, and McDonnel, and literary texts of diverse genres, to arrive at an understanding of terms and contexts that will equip the student to embark on a serious project in literary studies. A committed student in this course can also effectively develop a high quality and sophisticated proposal based on this course for future and higher studies.


ENGL 517 Lec 02: (CNST 591) - "Canada in the Anthropocene"

Instructor: Pamela Banting
Schedule: R 2:00-4:45

Description:

In this course we will read texts pertaining to living in the Anthropocene, the era of human-caused changes to planetary ecosystems. We will discuss climate change, food, water, energy, security, pandemic, wild weather, chaos, science, infrastructure, bioregionalism, indigenous ecological knowledge and ethics, subjectivity, wild animals, extinctions, slow violence, activism, resilience, utopia/dystopia, and life itself.


ENGLISH 519 - STUDIES IN A LITERARY PERIOD


ENGL 519 - Lec 01 - "The Victorian Bestseller"
Instructor:  Karen Bourrier
Schedule:  T/R 9:30-10:45

Description: 

What qualities made a bestseller in the Victorian period? In what sense can a work of literature be seen as a commodity? Paying special attention to the material conditions of publication in the nineteenth century, such as serialization and illustration in periodicals and newspapers, we will look at the literary marketplace from approximately 1850 to 1900. Alongside works of literature, we will also consider other forms of commodity in the Victorian marketplace, from soap to cookbooks. Works we will study may include Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations, Tennyson’s In Memoriam, Mary Elizabeth Braddon’sLady Audley’s Secret, Wilkie Collins’s The Moonstone, George Du Maurier’s Trilby and Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories, as well as cultural commodities such as Mrs. Beeton’s Cookery Book and John Everett Millais’s advertisement for Pears Soap.


ENGLISH 525 - ADVANCED SEMINAR IN A NATIONAL OR TRANSNATIONAL LITERATURE


ENGL 525 - Lec 01 - "Survival Stories: Explorers, Captives, Slaves"
Instructor:  Morgan Vanek
Schedule:  T/R 2:00-3:15

Description:

In this course, we will study the survival story, or the sensational tales of exploration, captivity, and enslavement that became immensely popular over the course of the long eighteenth century.

Informed by new methods in transatlantic studies, we’ll read these texts closely, treating them not as contexts for the rise of the ‘real’ eighteenth century novel, but instead as the foundations of a new canon with new stories to tell about the history of empire and the forms of literature and knowledge that it has produced. By the end of term, your research projects will begin to answer the following questions: How do these travellers’ stories of survival, often under extreme conditions, help to prop up, critique, or otherwise interrogate the imperial project that sets them in motion? Can these travellers return home again, and what happens when they do? Finally, what constitutes ‘survival’ in these texts – and how do these visions of serious threats to survival and the practices it takes to survive contribute to the story of empire, and to Britain’s imperial identity?


ENGLISH 529 - ADVANCED SEMINAR IN POPULAR/HISTORICAL GENRES


ENGL 525 - Lec 01 - "Stream of Consciousness"
Instructor:  Harry Vandervlist
Schedule:  T/R 11:00-12:15

Description:

"How did Modernist authors try to convey the experience of continuous thought and perception within the minds of fictional characters? This course examines early experiments in stream-of-consciousness technique, by authors including Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, and Dorothy Richardson.”