University of Calgary
UofC Navigation

300 Level Fall 2017


ENGLlSH 387: TOPIC IN LITERATURE AND SOCIETY


ENGL 387 Lec 01: "The Writing of Alice Munro"
Instructor: 
Schedule: 

Description:


ENGLISH 388: TOPICS IN READING POPULAR CULTURE


ENGL 388 Lec 01: "Supernatural Horror in Literature"
Instructor: Anthony Camara
Schedule: Tue/Thu 2:00-3:15

Description:

This class interrogates the relationship between horror literature and philosophy, taking seriously the notion that this often-maligned genre thinks with a high degree of conceptual sophistication about the nature of the cosmos, biological life, and human psychology. Works of horror fiction, we will see, do not simply espouse philosophical worldviews, but more importantly produce and explore philosophical problems. The overarching goal of this class is to cultivate an analytical and scholarly perspective towards this critically under-appreciated body of fiction. In doing so, we will address the following questions: what is it about the horrifying that fascinates us?  Why are we drawn to horror in movies, literature, and graphic novels?  Can horror make effective moral and ethical prescriptions?  Might such works change our attitudes towards others who are different from us, towards ecosystems, and towards the inhuman life forms that inhabit them? Or maybe horror has no such edifying intentions. Perhaps it reveals to us a frightening vision of a cosmos indifferent to, or even hostile towards, human life? The course tentatively features works by Edgar Allan Poe, Vernon Lee, H. P. Lovecraft, Shirley Jackson, Gemma Files, Stephen King, and Thomas Ligotti. The class also includes screenings of Robert Wise’s The Haunting and Drew Goddard’s The Cabin in the Woods.


ENGLISH 395: SPECULATIVE FICTION II: FANTASY


ENGL 395 Lec 01: "Speculative Fiction: Fantasy" 
Instructor: Christian Olbey
Schedule: T/R 9:30

Description:

This course begins its exploration of fantasy fiction with J.R.R. Tolkien to establish an understanding of classic concepts and motifs that define early expressions of the genre. With this understanding in place we will attempt to understand how the genre evolves through the twentieth and now into the twenty-first century. What is a fantasy novel? What value is there, if any, in the reading of fantasy stories? What reasons might there be to explain the continued popularity of the genre of fantasy? What is the relationship between the fantasy story and escapism? Can fantasy stories, like other forms of literature, generate meaningful critical engagements with important aspects of society and human life, or do these stories gratify a desire to escape vexing questions and difficult issues attached to our social reality? What is the relationship between contemporary and classical expressions of fantasy literature? These are the types of questions that this class will consider and explore through our critical reading and discussions of these texts.